Photo Gallery

Click below for a slideshow showing some of the striking photography you can enjoy in the Terminal Town book or traveling exhibit.

For a full list of our photo contributors, please visit our photo credits page.

  • Photo-4

    Eastern Airlines Electra at O’Hare taxis in front of a Boeing 720 jet, also painted in the carrier’s familiar “hockey stick” livery, in 1964. The tail of another 720, a Continental Golden Jet, can be seen in the distance. (Jon Proctor)

  • Photo-5.--Greyhound-dimler-shot---low-res-placeholder

    Spanning an entire block of N. Clark St. between Randolph and Lake, the Chicago Greyhound Terminal was a beehive of activity for decades. The massive facility compensated for its lack of exterior charm by having an innovative design that allowed arriving and departing buses to reach the station below street level. In this photograph, circa 1980, the Clark and Lake “L” station is visible in the distance. (Paul Dimler photo)

  • Photo-6

    The Pennsylvania Railroad’s premier train between Chicago and New York City—the Broadway Limited—pauses at Englewood Union Station on April 21, 1965. Passengers on this all-Pullman run, and other trains from the East Coast, could make timesaving transfers here to Rock Island trains heading west. The station (right center) appears to be in good condition, despite the challenges facing the surrounding neighborhood. (Marty Bernard photo)

  • Central Station

    Illinois Central’s Illini, an afternoon departure bound for Carbondale, IL., pokes out from Central Station’s modernized train shed on April 9, 1971, less than a month before Amtrak assumed responsibility for the nation’s intercity passenger trains. The IC station’s massive head house, clock tower, and rooftop billboard can be seen in the upper-left portion of this north-facing photograph. (George Hamlin photo)

  • Photo-1

    The vaulted ceiling of North Western Terminal’s waiting room is aglow from a combination of midday sun and floodlighting, while the floor reflects the fluorescent lights of retail kiosks. The station clock shows 1:30 p.m., well before the evening rush. The terminal’s Madison St. colonnade is on the left (south) side, circa 1975. (Mark Llanuza)

  • Photo-8

    A South Shore Line train leaves Randolph St. Station on a winter day in 1976. The skyline behind the train (note the iconic Carbide & Carbon Building, with its spire resembling the top of a champagne bottle) attests to the density of development near the station, which cultivated the commuter business and helped the carrier fend off abandonment before a government agency acquired it. (Mark Llanuza photo)

  • Photo-7

    This image, one of the many thousands from the extraordinary aerial photography archive of veteran Chicago planning and zoning consultant and aerial photographer Lawrence Okrent, shows Midway’s tarmac and passenger concourses dominated by planes painted in Southwest Airline’s signature colors—orange, purple, and red. This September 15, 2007 photo also shows the airport’s intimate relationship to the city’s Bungalow Belt. The CTA Orange Line station is at right. (Lawrence Okrent photo)

  • Photo-3

    A passenger with a child gazes at a group of United Airlines regional jets at Terminal 2 in June 2013, not long after the 50th anniversary of the dedication of the terminal. This glass overlook is virtually unchanged since 1962, although it is now behind security and inaccessible to visitors without tickets. (Chaddick Institute)

  • Pan American Airways jets are wingtip to wingtip at the Gary/Chicago Airport terminal in 2001. This discount carrier, having purchased rights to the legendary Pan American World Airways name and trademarks, used mostly Boeing 727 aircraft such as these aging examples. This low-cost reincarnation of Pan Am suspended service to Gary the following year. (Photo provided by Robert Gyurko)

    Pan American Airways jets are wingtip to wingtip at the Gary/Chicago Airport terminal in 2001. This discount carrier, having purchased rights to the legendary Pan American World Airways name and trademarks, used mostly Boeing 727 aircraft such as these aging examples. This low-cost reincarnation of Pan Am suspended service to Gary the following year. (Photo provided by Robert Gyurko)

  • Spanning an entire block of N. Clark St. between Randolph and Lake, the Chicago Greyhound Terminal was a beehive of activity for decades. The massive facility compensated for its lack of exterior charm by having an innovative design that allowed arriving and departing buses to reach the station below street level. In this photograph, circa 1980, the Clark and Lake “L” station is visible in the distance.  (Paul Dimler photo)

    Spanning an entire block of N. Clark St. between Randolph and Lake, the Chicago Greyhound Terminal was a beehive of activity for decades. The massive facility compensated for its lack of exterior charm by having an innovative design that allowed arriving and departing buses to reach the station below street level. In this photograph, circa 1980, the Clark and Lake “L” station is visible in the distance. (Paul Dimler photo)

  • Passengers wait for a southbound coach in front of the storefront Tornado Bus station at 2807 S. Kedzie Ave. on June 2, 2012. This popular Latino-oriented carrier complements its basic transportation offerings with bilingual customer service. (John Dalide photo)

    Passengers wait for a southbound coach in front of the storefront Tornado Bus station at 2807 S. Kedzie Ave. on June 2, 2012. This popular Latino-oriented carrier complements its basic transportation offerings with bilingual customer service. (John Dalide photo)