Maps

Click on the links below for a sampling of some of the custom maps appearing in the "Terminal Town" book & exhibit.

  • Map Union Station

    Map Union StationThis map shows the labyrinth of routes from Chicago Union Station in 1946. The serpentine networks of the Burlington Route and its connecting lines, Milwaukee Road, and Pennsylvania Railroad, together with the Alton Route service to St. Louis, gave travelers a dazzling array of choices. Dashed lines depict the western routes added in 1955 when Union Pacific trains began traveling to Chicago over the Milwaukee Road, thereby expanding the reach of Union Station’s trains to a remarkable 29 states and the District of Columbia.

  • This map shows the six principal locations in or near downtown Chicago that have been the origins and destinations of intercity bus routes since 1939. The street grid depicted is present day. Union Bus Depot at Roosevelt Rd. and Wabash Ave., and the Trailways Station at 20 E. Randolph, were dominant through the 1940s but later dwarfed by the Chicago Greyhound Station that opened in 1953. Several operators—most notably Chinatown carriers and Megabus—today use curbside locations. This map was prepared by Dennis McClendon of Chicago Cartographics.

    This map shows the six principal locations in or near downtown Chicago that have been the origins and destinations of intercity bus routes since 1939. The street grid depicted is present day. Union Bus Depot at Roosevelt Rd. and Wabash Ave., and the Trailways Station at 20 E. Randolph, were dominant through the 1940s but later dwarfed by the Chicago Greyhound Station that opened in 1953. Several operators—most notably Chinatown carriers and Megabus—today use curbside locations. This map was prepared by Dennis McClendon of Chicago Cartographics.

  • This map shows the most significant points where passengers passing through the Chicago region could make timesaving connections and thereby eliminate the need to transfer at downtown terminals. Using these locations could save passengers anywhere between 13 and 80 miles of travel. Illinois Central’s 63rd St.–Woodlawn Station, Englewood Union Station, and the various bus stations in Hammond, IN, were especially heavily used for intercity bus and train transfers. This map was prepared by Dennis McClendon of Chicago Cartographics.

    This map shows the most significant points where passengers passing through the Chicago region could make timesaving connections and thereby eliminate the need to transfer at downtown terminals. Using these locations could save passengers anywhere between 13 and 80 miles of travel. Illinois Central’s 63rd St.–Woodlawn Station, Englewood Union Station, and the various bus stations in Hammond, IN, were especially heavily used for intercity bus and train transfers. This map was prepared by Dennis McClendon of Chicago Cartographics.